Mathilda’s Weird World Weblog

June 10, 2008

An ice age sphinx? Probably not.

Filed under: Ancient Technology, Uncategorized — Tags: , , — mathilda37 @ 11:31 am

The greatest monumental sculpture in the ancient world, the Sphinx is carved out of a single ridge of stone 240 feet (73 meters) long and 66 feet (20 meters) high. The head, which has a markedly different texture from the body, and shows far less severe erosion, is a naturally occurring outcrop of harder stone. To form the lower body of the Sphinx, enormous blocks of stone were quarried from the base rock (and these blocks were then used in the core masonry of the temples directly in front and to the south of the Sphinx). While a few stubborn Egyptologists still maintain that the Sphnix was constructed in the 4th Dynasty by the Pharaoh Chephren (Khafre), an accumulating body of evidence, both archaeological and geological, indicates that the Sphinx is far older than the 4th Dynasty, and was only restored by Chephren during his reign. There are no inscriptions on the Sphinx, or on any of the temples connected to it that, that offer evidence of construction by Chepren, yet the so-called ‘Inventory Stele’ (uncovered on the Giza plateau in the 19th century) tells that the Pharaoh Cheops – Chephren’s predecessor – ordered a temple built alongside the Sphinx, meaning of course that the Sphinx was already there, and thus could not have been constructed by Chephren.

A much greater age for the Sphinx has been suggested by R.A. Schwaller de Lubicz, based upon geological considerations. Schwaller de Lubicz observed, and recent geologists (such as Robert Schoch, Professor of Geology at Boston University) have confirmed, that the extreme erosion on the body of the Sphinx could not be the result of wind and sand, as has been universally assumed, but rather was the result of water. Geologists agree that in the distant past Egypt was subjected to severe flooding. Wind erosion cannot take place when the body of the Sphinx is covered by sand, and the Sphinx has been in this condition for nearly all of the last five thousand years – since the alleged time of its 4th Dynasty construction. Furthermore, if wind-blown sand had indeed caused the deep erosion of the Sphinx, we would expect to find evidence of such erosion on other Egyptian monuments built of similar materials and exposed to the wind for a similar length of time. Yet the fact of the matter is, that even on structures that have had more exposure to the wind-blown sand, there are minimal effects of erosion, the sand having done little more than scour clean the surface of the dressed stones.

Additional evidence for the great age of the Sphinx may perhaps be indicated by the astronomical significance of its shape, being that of a lion. Roughly every two thousand years (2160 to be exact), and because of the precession of the equinoxes, the sun on the vernal equinox rises against the stellar background of a different constellation. For the past two thousand years that constellation has been Pisces the Fish, symbol of the Christian age. Prior to the age of Pisces it was the age of Aries the Ram, and before that it was the age of Taurus the Bull. It is interesting to note that during the first and second millennia BC, approximately the Age of Aries, ram-oriented iconography was common in Dynastic Egypt, while during the Age of Taurus the Bull-cult arose in Minoan Crete. Perhaps the builders of the Sphinx likewise used astrological symbolism in designing their monumental sculpture. The geological findings discussed above indicate that the Sphinx seems to have been sculpted sometime before 10,000 BC, and this period coincides with the Age of Leo the Lion, which lasted from 10,970 to 8810 BC.

Further support for this vast age of the sphinx comes from a surprising sky-ground correlation proven by sophisticated computer programs such as Skyglobe 3.6. These computer programs are able to generate precise pictures of any portion of the night sky as seen from different places on earth at any time in the distant past or future. Graham Hancock explains in Heaven’s Mirror that, “computer simulations show that in 10,500 BC the constellation of Leo housed the sun on the spring equinox – i.e. an hour before dawn in that epoch Leo would have reclined due east along the horizon in the place where the sun would soon rise. This means that the lion-bodied Sphinx, with its due-east orientation, would have gazed directly on that morning at the one constellation in the sky that might reasonably be regarded as its own celestial counterpart.”

The foregoing discussion means that the monumental sculpture of the Sphinx may have existed at a time when (according to prevailing archaeological theory) there were no civilizations on earth and humans had not yet evolved beyond hunter-gatherer lifestyles. This matter is so radical that scholarly reticence in acknowledging it is understandable. If the Sphinx is indeed this old then contemporary assumptions regarding the development of civilization must be entirely reworked and the mystifying question of Plato’s Atlantis should be given very serious consideration.

 

This is an article I’ve borrowed from somewhere on the internet. Firstly, I’d like to point out that the Sphinx is a naturally occurring huge lump of stone sitting on the sand, so attributing an astrological configuration to it is dubious at best, as it wasn’t placed in that position. The builders had to work with what they had, where it was.

Also, recent surveys of the Sphinx have shown that it’s eroding at a frighteningly quick rate, and some of the information I’ve seen suggest that the fissures aren’t caused by water at all, by various other causes, with the main culprit simply being the poor quality of the stone that the Sphinx is carved from.

Then there’s the issue of getting together a workforce to construct such a large object. You’d need sedentary skilled labourers, and for that you need agriculture for many generations prior to build up the skills and numbers necessary.

Agriculture arrived in the Nile Delta  from the near East about 5,500 BC, so this certainly allows for some form of earlier construction , (hunter gatherers don’t seem to go in for building large monuments). The Sphinx is built in the North, near the Nile Delta, so this allows an earlier construction too. So, a very earliest construction date of 5,000 BC then, but probably closer to the orthodox 2,500 BC, bearing in mind the rate of observed erosion on it.

Probability of being 10,500 years old, a pretty unlikely 5%

 Sorry Graham.

6 Comments »

  1. advanced civilazation always on equater routes i still believe egyptian s copied another advanced race of people perhaps aliens ? but didnt have blueprints and mummies a poor copy of advanced medical from another race of people

    Comment by adair — February 5, 2009 @ 10:36 pm

  2. “the Sphinx is a naturally occurring huge lump of stone sitting on the sand, so attributing an astrological configuration to it is dubious at best, as it wasn’t placed in that position. The builders had to work with what they had, where it was.”

    How does this make anything dubious? If it’s a big lump of shapeless rock the builders would have been free to decide, before they starting carving, what form the object would take and in which direction that form would face. Your argument is therefore totally invalid.

    “Then there’s the issue of getting together a workforce to construct such a large object. You’d need sedentary skilled labourers, and for that you need agriculture for many generations prior to build up the skills and numbers necessary. Agriculture arrived in the Nile Delta from the near East about 5,500 BC, so this certainly allows for some form of earlier construction , (hunter gatherers don’t seem to go in for building large monuments).”

    But this pre-supposes our current view of human history is correct. The whole point of the article is to suggest our current view of human history is incorrect. Your argument is therefore is based upon a logical fallacy and invalid. The article suggests that civilisations capable of building such objects existed at a time when our current understanding of history suggests only hunter-gatherer communities existed. If this is true than it is logical to assume the required ‘agriculture ‘ existed too.

    Comment by Reginald Blimp — June 27, 2011 @ 12:58 pm

    • Well, I’m very well accqueinted with the archaelogy of the Nile valley nad the Sahal. No agriculture prior to the Neolithic. And that started in West Asia with a very well understood time frame. The more ancient datings for the sphinx have been based on very very dubious pseudoscience.

      Comment by mathilda37 — December 27, 2011 @ 10:40 am

  3. Because a psychic is a reliable source of information…. NOT.

    10500 BC saw nothing in the Nile valley but hunter gatherers. I’m familiar with the archaeological sequence. It’s one of the most dug up areas in the world. Prior to the Neolithic you get a few pots and stone tools, then stone tools and a different culture. No lost civilisation.

    Comment by mathilda37 — December 27, 2011 @ 10:51 am

  4. THANK YOU Reginald Blimp for your response. You hit the nail on the head.

    I would REALLY like to know where YOU got your numbers, Mathilda37. 5,000 BC but most likely 2500 BC, and only a 5% chance it is as old as some think? I’m assuming you must have degrees in geology, ancient civilizations, sacred geometry (which they used back then), etc to back up all of your claims? Surely you stood in front of the Sphinx your very self with the appropriate knowledge and tools and verified your claims?

    Oh? What’s that? You did not?

    Congratulations, your entire article is a mere “educated” (ha, ha) guess based off of no amount of fact whatsoever.

    Perhaps you could explain to us how the geology of the Sphinx makes any sense based off your assumption? Like, why the rock on the head is completely different from the body? Where did the water erosion come from when the only possible time such a thing could happen was during the last Ice Age? Why does the body obviously depict a Lion that just so happens to have pointed at the constellation Leo around the time of 10,500 BC, yet the head which is made of a DIFFERENT KIND OF ROCK and thought to be a restoration is VASTLY disproportional to the Sphinx’s body and looks nothing like a Lion? Did you skip over the bit of information where the ‘Inventory Stele’ was found in the NINETEENTH CENTURY and tells of Chephren ordering a temple built along the already existing Sphinx? Or the part about how the different type of rock that makes up the “head” dates back to his rule?

    You need to accept that not only are you being lied to by world authorities on these subjects, but that humans are quite obviously not infallible, with known and scientifically backed-up information being debunked and proven incorrect EVERY DAY.

    We humans go back much further than you and most people think, and you know what?

    We’ve been receiving help ever since.

    Comment by Patrick Hosler — July 21, 2012 @ 6:46 pm

    • Actually I read the works of reputable published geologists, who have widely lambasted the claims of an ice age sphinx and with good reason. I’ve had one of the post in the comments here before. I also know a lot of actual archaeologists who been to Egypt and anthropologists who have bent my ears about the ridiculousness of the ice age sphinx claims and claims of very ancient high tech civilizations. For good reason; once you get down under the the Neolithic layers there’s nothing but hunter gatherers stone tools back to 40,000 bp.

      But of course, everyone qualified who disagrees with your belief is wrong.

      And I know a bitch of a lot about the archeology of the Northern Nile valley from 22k bp right through to the arrivals of the Neolithic. No civilization existed there except some hunter gatherers, possibly with a side line in taming the local fauna to keep on hand for handy slaughter and some wheat gathering. You should go out there and spend a few years digging in the dirt personally before letting off petulant little tirades.

      Where did the water erosion come from when the only possible time such a thing could happen was during the last Ice Age?

      I suggest you take a trip over to the Halls of Maat to read some of their pages.

      http://www.hallofmaat.com/modules.php?name=Articles&file=article&sid=29

      Comment by mathilda37 — January 31, 2013 @ 2:15 pm


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